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Hibiscus and Garlic

Hibiscus flower

 

Hibiscus and Garlic

Tyler

While living in Ocean Beach some decades ago we found an ad in our local paper for a pedigree golden retriever puppy for sale for $50 while at the time the going price was $400!
We went to look at him, Tyler de Diego, whose father was a champion and we instantly fell in love with him. After bringing him home we remarked on how mellow he was for a puppy.

golden retriever puppy
It turned out that the reason he was so mellow was that he had distemper, a viral infection that causes high fever, nerve derangement and usually death. What we noticed then was that he was eating the Hibiscus flowers growing in our yard.
I looked up Hibiscus to see what he was up to and found that it was most appropriate for his condition.

Jamaica

Hibiscus flowers are incorporated in a tea beverage known as “Agua de Jamaica”, a delicious, refreshing and a very popular beverage throughout Mexico.
It is classified as an antipyretic (lowers body temperature) and febrifuge (reduces fever).
The colorful pigments in the flowers indicate a high antioxidant value, another asset when dealing with viral infections.

Hibiscus tea

Animal Studies

In one study in rats, hibiscus extract increased the number of antioxidant enzymes and reduced the harmful effects of free radicals by up to 92%. 
Another rat study had similar findings, showing that parts of the hibiscus plant, such as the leaves, possess potent antioxidant properties.

Hibiscus

Hibiscus flower

Hibiscus is a genus of plants in the Malvaceae (Mallow) family native to warm temperate, subtropical and tropical regions throughout the world.
It has the following Properties:

  • antibacterial
  • anti-inflammatory
  • antiparasitic
  • antiseptic
  • digestive
  • diuretic
  • refrigerant
  • sedative
  • stomachic
  • tonic

The flower petals have been used for hair and skin care products, teas and homemade wines.

Hibiscus tea is delicious and easy to prepare at home

Simply add hibiscus flowers to a teapot and pour hot water over them. Let it steep for five minutes, then strain, sweeten it if desired and enjoy.

Hibiscus tea can be consumed hot or cold and has a tart taste similar to that of cranberries.

For this reason, it is often sweetened with honey or flavored with a squeeze of lime juice to balance the tartness.

Dried hibiscus can be purchased at your local health food store or online. Hibiscus tea is also available in pre-made tea bags.

Garlic

One of the books I recommend in classes is Herbal Handbook for Farm and Stable by Juliette de Bairacli Levy. It’s an excellent herbal for animal care. She was especially knowledgeable in herbal care and feeding of dogs.
She recommended garlic as a remedy for distemper.
Getting a dog to ingest garlic could be a challenge but I have had some experience with eating raw garlic myself. I learned that by biting into a lemon then chewing on raw garlic you don’t get the burning in your mouth. When it starts to burn, simply bite into the lemon again.

Garlic and Lemons
Based on this experience, I cut raw garlic into small pieces and soaked them in lemon juice, incorporating this into an electuary I called distemper balls and fed them to Tyler for two weeks at which time he was totally cured! 

ELECTUARIES
Mixing herbs into a palatable paste to get them down kids (of all ages), dogs, etc.

DISTEMPER BALLS
garlic
parsley
bran
honey
lemon juice
powdered Vitamin A
milk powder

Tyler lived another ten years becoming a beloved family member. And by the way, having been cured of distemper, he never ate the Hibiscus flowers again.

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